Hair Loss

Hair loss is common among both men and women. It most commonly manifests as what is known as male pattern baldness, also known as androgenic alopecia. Female pattern baldness also exists, but this rarely results in complete baldness. Hair loss may also result from the use of chemotherapy medicines. There is currently no known cure for hair loss.

Hair Loss Drugs

Hair Loss Symptoms

The chief symptom of hair loss is losing hair at a more rapid rate than the body can produce. This manifests in hair which is thinner on certain parts of the head than other parts, producing a distinct pattern over time. Patients may also report certain skin conditions – such as dermatitis – which can contribute to the thinning of hair over time. Losing hair can be distressful for both men and women, and this often manifests in the form of anxiety or stress. The stress can, in turn, contribute to greater hair loss and the cycle continues. Patients may find it challenging to cope with their new image. Patients may also experience hair loss as a symptom of chemotherapy treatment.

Hair Loss Causes

Male pattern baldness is universally caused by genetic factors which may be insurmountable from a medical perspective. The rate of hair loss may, though, be exacerbated by environmental effects – such as stress. The rate may also appear to accentuate due to the use of certain medications or hair products. Female pattern hair loss is, similarly, caused by genetic factors, though it is quite rare for females to experience total hair loss as seen in men. Hair loss may also be caused by chemotherapy, as the medicines used in treating cancer are sufficiently powerful to attack healthy cells as well as cancerous cells. Poor nutrition and stress can also contribute to hair loss. Patients with hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism may also experience hair loss, with some of this hair loss caused by the medication used in the treatment of these conditions.

Hair Loss Diagnosis

Hair loss is usually diagnosed by inspection. There are, however, a number of tests that may be performed to determine the rate of hair loss. One of these tests is known as the pull test. It involves gently tugging on three parts of the scalp – pulling approximately fifty hairs – and then counting the quantity of hairs that result. The hairs can also undergo analysis to determine how many of these hairs are at a late stage of growth. The physician may use the Hamilton-Norwood scale to determine the extent of hair loss in male pattern baldness. The scale details the typical stages by which men lose their hair. By matching the patient’s pattern with the patterns available on the scale, the physician can inform the patient of the nature and future progression of the problem.

Hair Loss Treatment

The chief symptom of hair loss is losing hair at a more rapid rate than the body can produce. This manifests in hair which is thinner on certain parts of the head than other parts, producing a distinct pattern over time. Patients may also report certain skin conditions – such as dermatitis – which can contribute to the thinning of hair over time. Losing hair can be distressful for both men and women, and this often manifests in the form of anxiety or stress. The stress can, in turn, contribute to greater hair loss and the cycle continues. Patients may find it challenging to cope with their new image. Patients may also experience hair loss as a symptom of chemotherapy treatment.